Welcome to the Bad River Youth Outdoors (BRYO) map site! These are story-maps from our summer 2013 watershed education program. We paddled and hiked to places in the Bad River watershed - both on the Bad River Reservation, and off-res in the Ceded Territory.

We learned about Ojibwe culture, water stewardship, and outdoor skills. We collected GPS waypoints, photos, and videos, and had a lot of fun! Click on a place name to open each story map! From Madeline Island, you can click and drag the map south to view our reservation and the top of the watershed in the famous Penokee Hills! Have fun exploring with BRYO!

GLIFWC disclaimer: Tribal reservation and ceded territory boundaries are representations and may not be the actual legally binding boundaries.

THPO disclaimer: Places indicated in these maps represent a small portion of locations that are significant in the living history of the Bad River Tribal membership. The entire Treaty Ceded Territories, Apostle Islands and Lake Superior are recognized as Traditional Cultural Properties and are held to be highly significant to the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa in both the United States and Canada. A significant number of sacred and historic sites, and ancient and historic burial grounds, have been omitted from these maps to protect the integrity of those areas, and to prevent disturbance of traditional cultural practices implemented by the Anishinaabe at those places.

Disclaimer about Ojibwemowin place-names: Regarding the orthography for phonetic spellings, some Ojibwemowin place-names in these story maps may be written down for the first time using the double- vowel system. As such, we want to respect the local names and spellings.

Miigwech, thank you, to our BRYO Map Site network!!

Credits: Patty Loew, Principal investigator; Jessie Conaway, Project Lead.

Chi miigwech, humongous thank you, to Professor Joe Rose, Sr. and Edith "Bardo" Leoso for their guidance with this project.

Miigwech, special thanks to: Mike Wiggins, Jr., Eldred Corbine, Esie Leoso, Barb Smart, Dana Jackson, Erv Soulier, Wendy Corbine, Milisa Corbine, Lloyd Hartwell, Ed Leoso, Jill Hartlev, Steve Prusse, Joe Corbine, Faye Maday, Cyrus Hester, Tammy D'Acquisto, Tony Gilane.

Photos, videos, waypoints, and photomaps collected by Bad River Youth Outdoors 2013 participants: Paige Wiggins, Tia Burns, Maddie Wiggins, Kreighton Wolf, Willy Bearskin, MacKenzee Livingston, Aaron Pitman, George Roundwind, Vanessa Scott.

Story map content for this web map composed by BRYO 2013/4 Map Workshop participants: Paige Wiggins, Tia Burns, Maddie Wiggins, Kreighton Wolf, Willy Bearskin, Isaak Livingston.

Thanks to Bad River Natural Resources Department's Naomi Tillison, and thanks to Great Lakes Fish & Wildlife Commission's Peter David, Miles Falck, Ben Michaels, and Charlie Rasmussen.

Basemap production: Jessie Conaway with the UW Madison Cartography Lab.

Artwork for map project logo and BRYO logo: Ed Wiggins

Thank you to our project sponsor, the Wisconsin Humanities Council.
WHC logo

Thanks to our Crowdfundraiser supporters: Rebecca Lescaze, Alexandra Lescaze, Susan Todd, Jim and Jayne Taylor, Bill Becker, Nancy Moore, Ridgway Hall, Patti Bursten, Ann Crittenden, Lindy Hart, Lila Sullivan, John Lang, John Clark, Kristin Shapiro, Joan Brennan, Pete Nowak, Susanna Conaway, Nancy Brennan, Jackie Sullivan, Nancy Tartt, Doug Swenson, Angus Worthing, David Peters, Kay Kendall, Maureen O'Leary, Kevin Lehner, James Conaway.

Thanks to our equipment sponsors and supporters: Confluence Watersports, Bending Branches Paddles, Sealsskirts, Fontana Sports, Eureka Tents, Kokatat, Northland College Outpost, Bad River Tribal 4-H program, Slick Rydr Trailers.

Photo of willy in river near a boat
Photo of Joe in a field
Photo of a student in a field
Photo of people shadows on the ground
Photo of silhouetted people on river

At the Bad River's mouth we spent a lot of time. What we did there was we went swimming,canoeing,and kayaking. Also Jess,Lynn,Joe Rose,and our Mama Bear told us stories, and told us what poison ivy and a bunch of other plants look like. Also that was our 2nd Camp site after we paddled all the way from Joe Rose's Sugarbush!

The Mouth is where the Bad River Empties into the lake. Also the sloughs are there too. What the Mouth looks like - is, it has a bunch of Poision ivy, A lot of bugs,and also a lot of Sand. That's what the Mouth Is/feels like.
- Bad River Youth Outdoors, Summer 2013

1st day of camp, all the kids went and ran into the lake.jpg
a little creek opening up into lake superior off of waverly, grandfather rocks can be found there
clean water, a beautiful blue sky,looks so fake, but its real i promise!
such little goof balls messing around on day 2 of the camping trip!

Lake Superior is an old lake. In this lake there have been shipwrecks, wars between native nations. This lake has seen many things. Lake Superior has meaning to Ojibwe people, from the formation of the Grandfather Rocks, to the cliffs on Madigan. Over by Long Island there was a war between the Sioux and the Ojibwe People. The Ojibwe left one survivor and killed over 300 Sioux.
- Bad River Youth Outdoors, Summer 2013

Photo of waterfall
Tyler Forks and Bad River flow out of the Penokees and meet up at Copper Falls
Photo of Joe in a field
The beautiful Bad River at Copper Falls
Photo of students
BRYO hiking at Copper Falls
tower
BRYO are standing at the Observation Tower Copper Falls. we could see the Penokee Mountains

We took a trip to Copper Falls and we saw the falls where the Bad River and Tyler Forks meet. Near the Penokees Mountains I saw the southern part of Bad River. After we took a trail that led to the observation tower, we went to the top-- it was about 3 stories tall! At the top we could see the Bad River watershed. We kept hiking and we came down a steep hill to the river. The river looked fast and like root beer. After that we took a trail that led to stairs, they were pretty long. Later when we went up the stairs to a small trail to the parking lot and we were finished.

Photo of students in field
Our Bear Family. Papa Bear is Paige, Mama Bear is Joseph, Baby Bear is Willy, Bear Cub is Tia,& Maddie is Maddie.
Paige Trying to catch a fish that willy had caught at Grant's Point
Paige Trying to catch a fish that willy had caught at Grant's Point
The beautiful water at Grant's Point
The beautiful water at Grant's Point
Tia-and-Willy-trying-not-to-get-our-shoes-drenched.
Tia and Willy trying not to get our shoes drenched.

We went to Grants point and found a black fish in a stream by the beach. From Grants point, we could see the Penokees Hills to the south. The obijwa went to war with the Sioux,Ho-chunk and Miskwaakii. The ojibwa had the most powerful army all around. They fought in boats between Grant's Point and Long Island. After they won, they would put the scalps up on posts on Long Island.
- Bad River Youth Outdoors, Summer 2013

canoeing
canoeing
canoeing

Honest John's Lake is near the Bad River Mouth. It is in next to the Bad River sloughs. We saw an eagle's nest in a white pine on the barrier island. We also saw Bryozoa, which is an animal but looks like a plant and a brain. It connects to plants that live underwater. There was a lot of lakeweed, which made it hard to paddle in the canoes. We camped at the mouth of the Bad River, then canoed from there through Honest John's Lake to get to Joe Rose's side of the lake. We saw a big bush of wild roses when we stopped for lunch. Honest John's has a lot of wild rice and cranberries. When we were paddling the Montreal canoe, Joe Rose taught us about the usefulness of plants. He taught us that the rose hips are edible, and can be used for tea.
- Bad River Youth Outdoors, Summer 2013

BRYO in front of Bog Lake looking out at Lake Superior.jpg
BRYO in front of Bog Lake looking out at Lake Superior
This is a BRYO Instructor standing in the water at Amnicon
This is a BRYO Instructor standing in the water at Amnicon
This is a BRYO member at Amnicon Bay, is located on Madeline IslandThis is a BRYO member at Amnicon Bay, is located on Madeline Island

Amnicon Bay is part of our Tribal Land on Madeline Island. It used to be and still is a fishing grounds for us (200 acres). Non - tribal members also have a 50 year lease there that started in 1967 and ends in 2017.

Bardo told us about how every Ojibwe Band had a chance in the 1800's to claim some of the land on the island, but only Bad River did. Also, Bog Bay is there - which has a lot of herbs and medicines that help you when you are sick. Bardo also said they can't have docks at Amnicon Bay because the Northern Waves will tear them down. When I was there last summer the waves were huge and it was also really windy. Me and my friend Willy made a big mistake to wear shoes that day. All of us were drenched on our whole bodies from the rain and the waves! As Bardo said - the Northern waves are huge!
- Bad River Youth Outdoors, Summer 2013

Bardo showing us old pictures of our ancestors
Bardo showing us old pictures of our ancestors
Bardo telling us about Madeline Island
Bardo telling us about Madeline Island
Beautiful Pattern  on an Old Ojibwe Artifact
Beautiful Pattern on an Old Ojibwe Artifact
Old Ojibwe Artifact (With Bardo)
Old Ojibwe Artifact (With Bardo)
Us Listening to Bardo about Back in the Day
Us Listening to Bardo about Back in the Day

The last time I went to Madeline Island was when we went with Edith Leoso, The Tribal Historic Preservation Officer (THPO). We went to the Native American Museum and learned new things about our culture. Madeline Island is one of the biggest islands in the Apostle Islands. But it is not included in the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore. Madeline Island is located in Lake Superior and is also part of Ashland County. At the Native American Museum, we ran around and played with all the things (WE DID NOT BREAK ANYTHING!! HOPEFULLY).

But we saw things that were in the past, that were actually pretty cool. Also we heard old stories from Edith Leoso.
- Bad River Youth Outdoors, Summer 2013

This is the Bad River falls where people go spearing for walleye
This is the Bad River falls where people go spearing for walleye
This is us with Ben  from GLFWIC at Bad River falls when he showed us the lamprey traps
This is us with Ben from GLFWIC at Bad River falls when he showed us the lamprey traps
View of Bad River Falls, ca. 1900. Rick Ruhanen Photo Collection; Bad River THPO
View of Bad River Falls, ca. 1900. Rick Ruhanen Photo Collection; Bad River THPO

At Bad River Falls, we met a guy named Ben from GLIFWC, the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission. He showed us a lamprey trap. He was doing research on lamprey, and they had to trap them so they didn't over populate. They would tag some to monitor their growth. They are trying to keep the walleye alive so we have them to eat, and sturgeon alive because the Bad River is their home.
Bad River Youth Outdoors, Summer 2013

Racing with our Group to see who is the fastest or the strongest
Racing with our Group to see who is the fastest or the strongest
Us canoeing and kayaking at Caroline Lake (also us getting stuck)
Us canoeing and kayaking at Caroline Lake (also us getting stuck)

I remember being at Caroline Lake and racing across the lake in canoes and kayaks. We tipped over a whole bunch of times because it was super hot outside. When we got to the other side of the lake, the water was warm and shallow. When you first get to the landing where you put your kayak or canoe in the water, there is this little stream. It was actually the Bad River coming out of Caroline Lake in a tiny little stream. We called it the "Baby Bad River!" I went swimming by the boat landing, and the water was super warm and it was fun. Bardo was telling us about how the Bad River starts in a big wetland area, and it has a lot of bogs and its very marshy. Caroline Lake is called Mashkiki and the Bad River is called MashkiZiibi because of all of the plant medicines in the marshes and wetlands. Mashki is short for "medicine" and Ziibi means "river."
-Bad River Youth Outdoors, Summer 2013

BRYO pulling out Invasive Cattails with Mr. Ken Couture (Bayshur)
BRYO pulling out Invasive Cattails with Mr. Ken Couture (Bayshur)
Kakagon, ca. 1889. Mike Munnell Photo Collection; Bad River THPO
Kakagon, ca. 1889. Mike Munnell Photo Collection; Bad River THPO
Tom O'Connor, Sr. on Kakagon. D. G. Noble Collection; Bad River THPO
Tom O'Connor, Sr. on Kakagon. D. G. Noble Collection; Bad River THPO

The Ojibwe name for Kakagon is OgaaKaagong, that means Home of the Walleye. This is a spawning place for walleye.The Bad River fish hatchery is located by the river. There were a lot of bugs at the mini-island that we stopped at for lunch, so then we just ate on the river in our boats on the way back to the dock! There is lot of wild rice out on the river, and it is starting to go away as the years go by. On Kakagon River, what we did was we pulled out invasive cattails. And we were paddling out there when some hatchery men were cutting pickerel weed out of the sloughs. With the cattails, you have to pull them out at the roots, otherwise they'll just grow back. The reason why we had to pull the cattail out was that it was overpowering the wild rice.

Ogaakaagong is important because it is the Home of the Walleye. Kakagon is sacred to us Bad River Native Americans, because wild rice and other foods that our ancestors ate grow on this river. This is the place where "food grows on water." At the fish hatchery we got to check out the different fish besides walleye that live in this river. We got to check out some bullheads. When we were looking at the bullheads, they showed us how to push down their sharp fins on the side. We got to pick them up, and then bring them back to the river to let them go.
-Bad River Youth Outdoors, Summer 2013

BRYO working for water
BRYO working for water
Jessie measuring Oxygen
Jessie measuring Oxygen
Lynn Tyler Forks
Lynn Tyler Forks

Joe Rose asked us to monitor water quality on the Tyler Forks River. We monitored on Tyler Forks at three places in the stream. Naomi and Ed from the Bad River Natural Resources Department came and told us about their work for clean water.

At Stricher Road, there was a USGS gauge next to the river, so we could get the temperature from the gauge. The group worked quickly. Everyone had a job to do because we had done monitoring 2 other times on Tyler Forks upstream. We caught crawfish, which means that the water quality is good.
Bad River Youth Outdoors, Summer 2013

BRYO Kids teaching other Bad River kids how to canoe
BRYO Kids teaching other Bad River kids how to canoe
BRYO Kids teaching other Bad River kids how to kayak
BRYO Kids teaching other Bad River kids how to kayak
Playing  in the creek that runs in at Waverly
Playing in the creek that runs in at Waverly

Waverly Beach used to be owned by a guy who named it Waverly Beach. A guy who owned it before Joe Rose ran it as a public campground. In 1982 Joe Rose bought it and made it a private campground and palce for teaching. Bad River Youth Outdoors did a beach clean-up on Lake Superior Day in July. After cleaning up we helped kids to learn how to kayak and canoe. At Waverly Beach, there are rocks that are called Grandfather Rocks. They are circlular, and are formed by rolling up and down the shore in the waves of the Lake. The Grandfather Rocks are used to tie down the skin on the Little Water Boy Drum. Joe Rose nowadays uses this land for ceremonies, and teaching the ways of the tradional native people.
Bad River Youth Outdoors, Summer 2013

Beach and Lake
Beach and Lake
Cliffs at Madigan
Cliffs at Madigan
Lodge at Madigan
Lodge at Madigan
maddie walking along the wood line
maddie walking along the wood line

Madigan is a spiritual ground for the Ojibwe people. At Madigan Beach, we swam and climbed the clay cliffs. We had a huge clay fight and got stuck in clay, to get the clay off we swam in the lake.

Joe rose told us that this land is where the Midewiwin people do Initiation Ceremonies because you can see Madeline Island from there. To Ojibwe people, Madeline island is the center of the earth.
-Bad River Youth Outdoors, Summer 2013

The Falls with Kreighton
The Falls with Kreighton
Tia Burns, Maddie Wiggins, and Kreighton Wolfe by the falls (Swimming)
Tia Burns, Maddie Wiggins, and Kreighton Wolfe by the falls (Swimming)

At Potato River Falls the water was so clear that you could see the bottom. The Potato River flows into the Bad River. The water is so clean it is good for the fish and leeches. We didn't know, and we went swimming and someone got out and there were leeches on them.

At the falls, the bottom of the river it was really rocky. The rocks got really slippery when they got wet. Joe Rose and Bardo do ceremonies at the top of the falls.
- Bad River Youth Outdoors, summer 2013

Elders Dancing an Inter tribal at the Badriver Powwow
Elders Dancing an Inter tribal at the Badriver Powwow
Tia at the Pow wow Grounds
Tia at the Pow wow Grounds
Tia's Uncle Mike
Tia's Uncle Mike

The Pow-wow Grounds are where memories were made, well for me at least. The Pow-wow Grounds is where Everybody is having a good time and always smiling. People are dancing or singing or drumming. Even though the Pow-wow Grounds are pretty small. It is a good place to see/visit your friends or family that live far away. You also make new friends. I started dancing when I was about a year or 2 on my own. In Odanaang the Pow wow represents the wild rice harvest. But,this year in 2013, the 34th Manoomin Pow-wow was for Bob Powless Sr. He passed away a year or 2 ago. But the Pow-Wow grounds also have history.

Like in the 1970's it used to be a baseball field. They had the Pow-wow on the baseball field too. But a long long time ago they almost lost their privileges to have the "Wild Rice/Manoomin Pow-wow".

As Joe Rose said, how they got the Pow-wow to come back is that Frank Connors asked him if he wanted to help him plan one. Joe Rose obviously said "Yes," and that they had to bring Drummers from other Tribes to come and Drum. They alomst lost the language too. But, today the Tribe is working on it to bring the language back. The reason they want to get the language back is that our ancestors would want us to learn what they did and said. Like they want us to learn the traditional dances and songs. Such as the Feather Dance and Hoop Dance. Bad River Youth Outdoors, 2013

BRYO in Penokees
BRYO in Penokees
Penokees Birds-Eye View!
Penokees Birds-Eye View!
st peters dome fall rainbow
st peters dome fall rainbow
Sunset in the Penokees
Sunset in the Penokees

The Penokees are in danger because of the mine that may be built.

The tailings of the mine will leave toxic waste. It may not seem like it will affect everything, but it will - because the smallest thing can happen and it can affect a lot. Bardo showed us an example of how this works - she had us all stand in a line tallest to shortest, shoulder-to-shoulder, and she gently pushed on the tallest person. Everyone of us felt an impact. She explained that's how the waterways are - everything's connected - and that's how they work. Bad River Youth Outdoors, Summer 2013

Penokees photo credits: Joel Austin. Used with the artist's permission.

Sugarbush lake  is an oxbow
Sugarbush lake is an oxbow
Swamp Mlikweed is a native plant that grows in the Bad River water shed
Swamp Mlikweed is a native plant that grows in the Bad River water shed
This is BRYO at Sugarbush lake pointing at where it is on the map
This is BRYO at Sugarbush lake pointing at where it is on the map

Sugarbush lake. On our camping trip we went to see Sugarbush lake. We found a dried up river and followed it to the lake. There we found swamp milkweed. Right next to where we found Sugarbush Lake, Joe Rose puts taps there in the maple tree's in the spring. We also learned today from Bardo that a long time ago by Sugarbush Lake there were a bunch of wigwams along the Bad River banks. There are a bunch of people that died from a disease in 1918 - it was call influenza. The people that died were buried in a cemetery near the river.
- Bad River Youth Outdoors, 2013

Campout-Day-2
Campout Day 2
paddingling
Paddling
The group
The group
The Mouth
The Mouth

I remember that the Bad River was really windy. When we got there we were setting up our tents but they kept flying away!

We tried to measure how deep it was, but our paddles were too short to touch the bottom.

At night in our tents we could hear the Bad River waves hitting the shore. Bardo taught us about how the French couldn't get up the Bad River because of the falls. So they named it "Bad River" in French. In the late 1600s, Radisson and Grosseilliers saw Ojibwe Indians on the Bad getting their gardens ready.
- Bad River Youth Outdoors, 2013

Amnicon Point
La Pointe
Grants Point
Lake Superior
Kakagon River
Bad River Mouth
Honest Johns
Waverly Beach
Madigan Beach
Pow Wow Grounds
Sugarbush Lake
Bad River Falls
Potato River Falls
Copper Falls
Tyler Forks
Penokees
Bad River
Caroline Lake